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Awareness among women in the general population

The Ovarian Cancer Awareness Measure was used to measure awareness of ovarian cancer among women in the general population.1

Telephone interviews were carried out between 5 February and 1 March 2016. A random digit dialling sampling approach was used including 25 per cent mobile numbers to reduce any age bias (as younger women are less likely to live in accommodation with a landline). In total 1343 women took part in the survey.

The research was carried out by Opinion Leader who are a member of the Interviewer Quality Control Scheme and have Market Research Quality Standards Association accreditation. All research was conducted by their in-house telephone research team.

Knowledge and experience among practicing GPs

A survey of practicing GPs across the UK was used to measure GP awareness and experience of ovarian cancer.

The survey was carried out online between 26 February and 5 March 2016 and in recognition of their time, GPs were paid a small fee to participate. The sample was taken from the membership of Doctors.net which is free and gives doctors access to forums, Continuous Professional Development and wider resources. Doctors.net is accessed by approximately one in three UK GPs. The opportunity to take part was shown to GPs currently practicing in the UK on the landing page following sign-in and in the final few days of the survey appeared as a pop-up alert to encourage final completions. To ensure a geographically representative sample across the UK the survey was closed in each region as its respective quota was filled. A total of 504 GPs took part in the survey.

The research was carried out by medeConnect whose research audience spans a wide range of health professionals both in the UK and globally. It was carried out as a bespoke survey.

Women with ovarian cancer

The survey of women with ovarian cancer asked women about their experiences from symptoms, through to diagnosis and treatment. The survey was open to all women with ovarian cancer diagnosed since 2010 (approximately 16,000) currently living in the UK.2

The survey ran online from 1 April to 14 August 2016. It was promoted through Target Ovarian Cancer’s website, digital mailing list and social media. Promotional postcards were sent to every cancer unit and centre across the UK and hard copies were mailed to those women on Target Ovarian Cancer’s database in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales who did not receive the digital mailing, to help increase the response rate in these nations. In total 396 women with ovarian cancer took part in the survey.

Nurses working with women with ovarian cancer

The survey of nurses working with women with ovarian cancer asked about their experiences of caring for women and the support they are able to provide.

The survey ran online from 25 April to 14 August 2016. It was promoted through Target Ovarian Cancer’s network of Gynaecological Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialists, promoted at the annual conference of the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses and via the Pathfinder Advisory Panel. In total 41 nurses took part in the survey.

The majority of nursing support for women with ovarian cancer is provided by Gynaecological Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialists or Advanced Nurse Practitioners - for simplicity, we have referred to Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) or nurses throughout this report.

Family and friends

The survey of the family and friends of women with ovarian cancer asked about their experience and the impact on them of their relative’s or friend’s diagnosis. For those women no longer with us, it also provided a chance to capture experiences of the care and support provided to women with ovarian cancer right at the end of their life.

The survey ran online from 4 May to 14 August 2016. It was promoted through Target Ovarian Cancer’s website, digital mailing list and social media. This was the first time a survey capturing the experiences of family and friends had been included in Pathfinder and in total 189 people took part.

This data has been used carefully in the context of reporting the experiences of the women with ovarian cancer being cared for, recognising that family members and friends may not have been aware of all aspects of a woman’s treatment and care. These findings are therefore presented as exploratory only.