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Researcher in the labClinical trials offer women the opportunity to access new cancer drugs, improve understanding of the disease and treatment options, and access the highest quality care. Research shows that those taking part in clinical trials have improved survival rates, regardless of whether they receive the new treatment or the standard treatment.26

Among women with ovarian cancer, 33 per cent said someone had asked them if they would like to join a clinical trial. Table 8 shows this has changed little since the first Pathfinder in 2009.

Table 8 – Number of women with ovarian cancer talked to about, participating and interested in clinical trials

Pathfinder

Women talked to about clinical trials (per cent)

Women taking part in clinical trials (per cent)

Women not on a trial who would like to join one (per cent)

2009

39

24

N/A

2012

30

20

N/A

2016

33

25

55

This broadly corresponds to the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey, where 38 per cent of women with ovarian cancer reported that someone had discussed taking part in cancer research.27 Findings also showed that women were happy to travel to take part in the latest trials, with 66 per cent of those wanting to take part in clinical trials prepared to travel to another hospital to do so.

When asked about their reasons for wanting to take part in clinical trials, 73 per cent of women with ovarian cancer said they felt it was important to take part in trials so knowledge and treatment can advance.