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Awareness of the symptoms of ovarian cancer is vital if more women are to be diagnosed earlier yet Pathfinder 2016 found just one in five women able to name bloating as a symptom of ovarian cancer. We need national awareness campaigns that include the symptoms of ovarian cancer in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales so that every woman knows the symptoms to look out for.

Our campaign in England

Annwen-Jones-Chief-executive-Target-Ovarian-Cancer

Annwen Jones, Chief Executive

“This programme is an important opportunity to make a very real difference to women’s lives. We are hoping for positive results from the regional pilot programme, and will continue to campaign for a national awareness programme.”

Target Ovarian Cancer has long campaigned for ovarian cancer to be included as part of the Department of Health’s Be Clear on Cancer symptom awareness programme in England.

So far we have seen a local and regional ovarian cancer pilot. In the interim report for the regional ovarian cancer pilot Public Health England found that the campaign was successful in raising awareness of the symptoms of ovarian cancer but initial findings suggested it had yet to show an increase in the number of women diagnosed as a result of the campaign.

A full and final evaluation report for the regional ovarian cancer pilot will be published when analysis of all the findings is complete.

In the meantime ovarian cancer has been included in a new type of campaign being piloted by Public Health England which groups symptoms together by the part of the body in which they occur. The abdominal symptoms campaign will run from February to March 2017 in the Midlands. It is aimed at both men and women and includes bloating as one of the main symptoms.

... in Northern Ireland

Thanks to the campaigning of Una Crudden, supported by Target Ovarian Cancer, the Public Health Agency ran an ovarian cancer awareness initiative in 2014. They have since launched Be Cancer Aware to raise awareness of all cancers, although there has yet to be an ovarian cancer specific campaign. 

... in Scotland

The Detect Cancer Early programme aims to raise awareness of symptoms that might be cancer. Detect Cancer Early has yet to feature ovarian cancer within an awareness campaign. However, as part of their work to improve early diagnosis, Scotland produced new clinical guidelines for ovarian cancer in 2013. These enable GPs to refer women for CA125 testing and ultrasound at the same time, rather than having to wait for CA125 results first as is the case in the rest of the UK.

... in Wales

Thanks to the campaigning of Annie Mulholland, the Welsh Government backed a GP awareness initiative in 2016, sending Target Ovarian Cancer GP toolkits to every GP practice in Wales. Since then, the Welsh Assembly Petitions Committee has produced a report calling for a public facing ovarian cancer awareness campaign in Wales.

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